Asian Tiger Mosquito (Aedes albopictus)

The Asian tiger mosquito or 'forest mosquito' is native to the tropical and subtropical areas of Southeast Asia. However in the past couple of decades this species has invaded many countries. Aedes albopictus is an epidemiologically important vector for the transmission of many viral pathogens, including the Yellow fever virus, dengue fever and Chikungunya fever, as well as several filarial nematodes such as Dirofilaria immitis.

Striped Shield Bug (Graphosoma lineatum)

This species is very common in the Maltese islands.  Graphosoma is a genus of the Pentatomidae family. The Striped shield bug is also known as the Italian Striped-Bug and Minstrel Bug. It is often found on the flowers of the Greater Pignut, Wild Carrot plant or on the flower of the Giant Fennel. The bold red and black warning colours (aposematism) indicate that the insects are foul-tasting. The insects are common across Southern Europe. This species grows to around 1cm in length.

Nursery Web Spider (Pisauridae)

Nursery web spiders are spiders of the family Pisauridae. They resemble wolf spiders (family Lycosidae), but they carry their egg sacs by means of their jaws and pedipalps (instead of attaching them to their spinnerets). When the eggs are about to hatch, a mother spider will build a nursery "tent", put her egg sac inside, and mount guard outside. The namenursery web spider is especially given to the European species Pisaura mirabilis, but the family also includes fishing spiders and raft spiders. Unlike the wolf spiders, which have two very prominent eyes in addition to the other six, the eyes of the nursery web spiders are more or less the same size. Many species are able to walk on the surface of still bodies of water, and may even dive beneath the surface for a time to escape enemies. In escaping predators, they may very well jump a distance of five or six inches. However, they do not find it easy to make their way up extremely smooth surfaces such as glass. The female spider will sometimes attempt to eat the male after mating. The male, to reduce the risk of this, will often present the female with a gift such as a fly when approaching in the hope that this will satisfy her hunger, and sometimes this gift is a fake present intended to fool the female.

Ref: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nursery_web_spider